A study of irish folklore and superstitions

Popular Irish folkltales include the Otherworld An Saol Eilewhich revolves around the idea of supernatural manifestations and beings. Other classics include leprechaunsfairiesrainbowsCu ChluainChildren of LirDullahan headless horsemenPookas, Changelings.

A study of irish folklore and superstitions

Irish folklore has been best preserved in rural areas - for example the Irish wake traditions of whiskey, snuff and music illustrated here. Traditional Irish Folklore A central aspect of Irish folklore is the wealth of traditional beliefs and superstitions which have been held by Irish people over the centuries.

Many of these beliefs can be traced to Celtic traditions which the Catholic church failed to erradicate completely. Looking back at my childhood in Ireland, I find it amazing that so many traditional superstitions and cures were believed in, alongside Catholic doctrines and the modern scientific world.

Belief in these old superstitions is no longer as strong as it was in the days before modern science, but they nonetheless continue to be part of the richness and uniqueness of Irish culture. While Irish fairy figures such as the Leprechaun and the Banshee are well-known around the world, some of the more everyday traditions of Irish folklore are in danger of being forgotten - from belief in magical cures and holy wells to superstitions about unlucky omens and fairy trees.

While these beliefs might seem strange and out-dated to outsiders, I believe they give richness and meaning to life and I hope that they will continue for many years to come. Read on for an overview of some of the A study of irish folklore and superstitions common Irish beliefs and superstitions Traditional Irish Beliefs Belief in fairy folk: These beliefs are almost died out now, but for many centuries the Irish were convinced of the existence of magical creatures such as leprechauns, pookas, selkies seal-folkmerrows mer-people and the dreaded Banshee.

Older folk will still tell tales of hearing a Banshee, or even of an encounter at night with a fairy sprite. You can read more about these fairies at my article: Forgotten Fairies of Irish Folklore. Most of them involved potatoes, chanting certain words and then burying the potato.

In fact there are still people in Ireland who will go to healers today, where they can be recommended to try traditional cures such as saying certain prayers, taking herbs, or visiting a holy well Belief in the magical healing ability of natural springs dates back to pre-Christian times in Ireland.

The Celtic people of Ireland believed springs were sacred places where the underworld met our world, and where the power of the Goddess Aine was particularly strong.

People still commonly visit these wells today, to take the waters and leave an offering - whether a few coins or a prayer card. Another Celtic tradition which survived long into Christian times was the belief in blessings and curses.

There are ancient stones, called bullaun stones, which were believed to lend power to a blessing or a curse - if the person saying the words was touching a bullaun stone at the time, their words were thought to come true.

With the coming of Christianity to the island, the tradition of curses gradually dropped away due to its potential to be associated with black magic, but the tradition of Celtic blessings continued in Christianized form and has produced many beautiful blessing-prayers.

A study of irish folklore and superstitions

Bullaun stones featured in Irish folklore as the most powerful place to utter a blessing, or a curse. They are recognizable by their hollowed centre which are thought to have been used for baptisms in early Christian times.

Common Irish Superstitions Fairy trees: Interestingly, these trees can still be found across Ireland today. While most people avow they do not believe in fairies, neither will they risk the bad luck believed to stem from cutting down one of these trees!

Hawthorn trees in particular are associated with fairies, and it is also considered bad luck to bring a branch of hawthorn blossom into your house. Sailors and fishermen have held onto superstitions longest in Ireland - as a form of protection against the unpredictable and dangerous moods of the ocean.

Red-headed women have traditionally been considered to bring very bad luck to a boat or ship. Changing the name of a boat was believed to bring better luck.

In some coastal communities it was believed that blowing out a candle was extremely bad luck as it meant that a sailor somewhere at sea would die - and instead they let their candles burn down and die out naturally.

Many sights were believed to be an omen of bad luck to come in Irish folklore.Mar 03,  · Irish fairy tales and folklore are populated with a wonderful collection of magical creatures and supernatural beings.

Leprechauns are so famous they can sell breakfast cereal, and many people have heard the legend of Reviews: The Women of Irish Myths. Irish mythology, which is basically synonymous with Celtic mythology, is packed with legends, symbols, and barnweddingvt.com the leprechaun to Saint Patrick, Irish stories.

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Irish Folklore: Myth and Reality

Jun 05,  · Irish folklore has been best preserved in rural areas - for example the Irish wake traditions of whiskey, snuff and music illustrated here. Traditional Irish Folklore A central aspect of Irish folklore is the wealth of traditional beliefs and superstitions which have been held by Irish people over the barnweddingvt.coms: folklore is the content, while folkloristics is the study (dates) of folklore Chapter 1: How old is the study of folklore in the USA?

Established as a discipline in the 's (American Folklore Society established in . Irish Folklore and Superstitions: Leprechaun, Banshee & Leprechaun's are short, aged, intoxicated, shoemakers, who are guardians of ancient treasure.

Irish folklore consists of many classics that are repeated to this day. Popular Irish folkltales include the Otherworld (An Saol Eile), which revolves around the idea of supernatural manifestations and barnweddingvt.com beings appear in many of the folkloristic genres such as ballads, popular song, legends, memorates, belief statements and folkloric material. Jun 05,  · Irish folklore has been best preserved in rural areas - for example the Irish wake traditions of whiskey, snuff and music illustrated here. Traditional Irish Folklore A central aspect of Irish folklore is the wealth of traditional beliefs and superstitions which have been held by Irish people over the barnweddingvt.coms: Anthro Intro to the Study of Irish Folklore: Archives and Artifacts reading University of California, Berkeley ANTHRO - Spring Anthro Intro to the Study of Irish Folklore: Archives and Artifacts reading 34 pages Anthro Intro to the Study of Irish Folklore: Folklore and Poverty.

Lepricans are normally dressed in pointed, or curled shoes and a green outfit. They avoid human contact for they have riches to offer a h.

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